View Mac Data Collected by Aternity

This section lists the device details of an Apple Mac computer collected by Aternity when you install Aternity Agent for Mac. In general, You can monitor the performance of Windows devices (laptops, desktops, tablets), Apple Mac devices (desktops, laptops), mobile devices (iOS, Android) and virtual sessions (VDI and virtual applications). Install the Aternity Agent for Mac on an Apple Mac laptop or desktop.

The Agent for Mac monitors the device's details and dynamic resource usage, and its health events, including system and application health events. It also monitors managed and discovered native desktop applications (since version 2.4) and all web applications running in Google Chrome on your Mac:

Monitor Macs with the new Agent for End User Devices for Mac

This page contains the following details:

Supported Mac Computers (Running the Aternity Agent for Mac)

To monitor an Apple Mac with Aternity Agent for Mac, it must have the following minimum system requirements:

Attribute Requirement
Agent for Mac

Supported versions of Agent for Mac: 2.4, 3.0, 3.1.x, 3.2.x

Mac operating system

macOS 10.14 (Mojave) (since version 3.1), macOS 10.13 (High Sierra) (since version 2.4), macOS 10.12 (Sierra), OS X 10.11 (El Capitan), or OS X 10.10 (Yosemite)

Processor

Mac computer with Intel 64-bit CPU.

Resource usage

The Agent for Mac typically uses:

  • CPU: Total utilization across all cores less than 1%.

  • RAM: The Aternity Agent for Mac uses approx. 200-300MB of physical memory.

  • Storage: At least 0.5GB free disk space available.
  • Bandwidth: Network traffic load overhead increases by approx. 0.02 kilobytes per second (KBps) incoming to the device, and approx. 0.05KBps reporting data to Aternity.

Monitor web applications

Monitor any web application in any version of Google Chrome released in the past two years. For legacy Agents (on Windows until Agent 9.1.x or on Mac until Agent for Mac 2.3), you must also manually add the Aternity Extension for Chrome to monitor web page load events (WPM) and usage.

Device Details of Apple Macs

Aternity collects many attributes associated with the device itself, which remain relatively static, like its hardware configuration, or its operating system. You can view this information in the Device Details dashboard.

Device Details of an Apple Mac computer
Field Description
City

Displays the city of the current location of the device.

Displays only if Aternity SaaS Administration manually mapped this computer's subnet or other device attribute to a location name.

Country

Displays the country of the current location of the device.

Displays only if Aternity SaaS Administration manually mapped this computer's subnet or other device attribute to a location name.

CPU Cores

Displays the number of CPU cores of the device.

CPU Speed

Displays the speed of the CPU processors of the device.

Department

Displays the name of the department to which the user or the device belongs.

Displays only if Aternity SaaS Administration manually mapped this device to a department.

Device ID

(Mac only) An Apple Mac's device ID is its Hardware UUID (universally unique identifier), as displayed in About This Mac > System Report.

If some Macs have the same name, use the device ID to pinpoint a specific device.

Device ID (UUID) of a Mac
Device Type

Displays the type of monitored device. For Apple Macs, these are:

  • Desktops are any monitored MacBook running macOS or OS X.

  • Laptops are any monitored laptop running macOS or OS X.

Hostname

Displays the hostname of the monitored device. View it in the Windows Control Panel > System > Computer Name, or on Apple Macs in System Preferences > Sharing > Computer Name.

IP Address

Displays the device's internal IP address (including IP v6 if the device runs Agent 10 or later) which it uses to connect to Aternity.

Last Reboot Time or Last Boot

Displays the date and time of the last boot of the device. The total boot time on a Mac device starts when the system logs the start of the boot, and ends when the system is ready for sign in.

Location / Business Location

Displays the current geographic location of the device.

Displays only if Aternity SaaS Administration manually mapped this computer's subnet or other device attribute to a location name.

Manufacturer

Displays the name of the vendor which created this device, like Samsung, Apple, Dell, Lenovo, and so on.

Memory

Displays the size of physical RAM of the device.

Model

Displays the name and the model number of the device, like iPhone 6s, GalaxyTab8, MacBook Pro 12.1, Dell Latitude D620.

Network in Use

(Devices with Agent 9.x or later) Displays the type of network connection of the device: Mobile or WiFi, and also LAN (for non-mobile devices only).

Operating System or OS Name

Displays the generic name and version of the operating system (like MS Windows 10, MS Windows Server 2008 R2, MacOS 10.3, iOS 10 or Android 6).

Noise Level - WiFi

(Macs only) Displays the background noise level of the WiFi connection for this device, measured in decibels. High noise levels lower the quality of a connection (signal to noise ratio), which slows the effective speed of that connection, which in turn lowers an application's performance.

OS Version

Displays the full name, the exact version number, and the service pack version of the operating system. In Windows 10, it includes the release ID (like Microsoft Windows 10 Enterprise 1507). Use this to differentiate between details of the same operating system. For example, it lists MS Windows Server 2008 R2 Enterprise SP 1.0 separately from MS Windows Server 2008 R2 Enterprise SP 2.0.

OS Type

Displays the broad category of the operating system. Use this to differentiate between different major operating system groups. For example, it displays all releases of Microsoft Windows as MS Windows, all releases of Windows Server as MS Windows Server or all releases of iOS as iOS.

SNLR - WiFi

(Macs only) Displays the WiFi signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), which is the strength of the data measured in decibels minus the background noise. Low SNR impacts significantly on network performance. Higher speed connections require a higher SNR. For example, at 54 Mbps you need an SNR of at least 25 decibels.

Subnet

Displays the device's subnet configuration used to connect to Aternity (including IP v6 if the device runs Agent 10 or later).

Time Zone

(From Agent 9.2 or Agent for Mac 2.3) Displays the time zone of the device as set in its operating system.

Wifi BSSID

Displays the ID (MAC address) of the wireless access point, which the device currently uses to connect to a WiFi network.

Wifi Channel

Displays the channel number which your device uses to connect to the WiFi router. Use this to ensure channels do not overlap one another in the same physical space. Your network performance significantly drops if a nearby WiFi router uses an overlapping channel with the same network speed.

Wifi SSID

Displays the name of the WiFi network where the device currently connects.

Dynamic Resource Usage of Apple Macs

Aternity also collects a monitored Mac's dynamic usage of system resources, like CPU, memory, battery, disk space and so on. You can view this information in the Troubleshoot Device dashboard.

Troubleshoot an Apple Mac
Field Description
Battery Level / Percentage

(Macs and Mobile) View the percentage battery charge for this device at any time.

Additional data related to battery status:

  • Battery Charging is true or false depending on whether it is currently being charged.

  • Battery Health status as reported by the operating system (not available in iOS).

CPU Usage / Utilization

Displays the percentage CPU utilization of the core with the greatest usage at a given time. For example, if the device has four CPU cores, where one is at 80%, one is at 60% and the others are idle, it will display a value of 80%.

Free Space

Displays the amount (GB) of free space on the device's system disk which contains the operating system installation..

Network Speed - WiFi

(Macs and in Windows from Agent 9.2) Displays the potential speed (bandwidth) of the WiFi connection at that moment, in megabits per second (Mbps). Lower WiFi bandwidth can be due to poor signal strength or overlapping channels, which slows the network time. In Windows, see the potential speed in the Control Panel > Network and Sharing > Adapter Settings > Status of the WiFi connection. In Macs, view it in About This Mac > System Report > Network > Wi-Fi.

WiFi network speed on Windows and Macs
Noise Level - WiFi

(Macs only) Displays the background noise level of the WiFi connection for this device, measured in decibels. High noise levels lower the quality of a connection (signal to noise ratio), which slows the effective speed of that connection, which in turn lowers an application's performance.

Physical Memory Utilization / Usage

Displays the percentage usage of the device's physical RAM memory at a given time.

Signal Strength - Wifi

(Windows Agent 9.2 or later, Macs and mobile devices) Displays the percent strength of the WiFi signal which the device receives, which can impact communication speed. For more details, hover your mouse over the graph in the dashboard to see the name of the WiFi network connection (SSID), the wireless network card MAC address (BSSID), and the WiFi channel.

View the details of the wireless network connection
SNR - WiFi

(Macs only) Displays the WiFi signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), which is the strength of the data measured in decibels minus the background noise. Low SNR impacts significantly on network performance. Higher speed connections require a higher SNR. For example, at 54 Mbps you need an SNR of at least 25 decibels.

Top Processes (CPU Usage / Utilization)

Displays the processes occupying the highest CPU percentage on the device during the timeframe, and view the maximum usage for each process. For example, when an intensive graphics application uses a high CPU for several minutes, or an application hangs.

Top Processes (Physical Memory Utilization / Usage)

Displays the processes which utilize the most physical memory (known as the total working set) during the timeframe, and view the maximum physical memory usage for each process.

User Details on Apple Mac

Field Description
User Name

Displays the username signed in to the device's operating system.

Performance Data of Discovered Applications on Apple Mac

You can monitor managed and discovered native desktop applications (since Agent for Mac 2.4) and all web applications running in Google Chrome on your Mac. Use the Aternity Extension for Chrome to monitor web apps in Google Chrome.

Field Description
Application Name

Displays the name of the monitored application, as it appears throughout the system. You can customize it when you add it as a managed application.

Errors (Page Loads)(For web applications only)

Web errors are errors experienced by applications which receive an error as a response to their HTTP request for a page load, like HTTP 40x errors (like Error 404 Page Not Found), and 50x errors (like unauthorized access messages) for the whole page (not a missing element like an image).

Page Load Time (For web applications only)

The web page load time is the time required for a web page to load and finish rendering in a browser, from sending a URL request to when the page's events finish loading and it has a status of Completed. This measurement does NOT include the time to load additional page elements which occur after the main page has loaded, such as iframes that are embedded separate web pages, AJAX calls after the page is complete, or bookmarks with # in the URL). It does include AJAX calls that the page makes before it is complete.

Web page load time
Usage Time

The usage time of an application is the total time it is running, in the foreground, and being used. This includes the wait time, the time a user spends waiting for the application to respond. For web applications, the usage time is when both the browser window and the application's tab are in the foreground.

Wait Time

The wait time of a Windows application is defined as the time users spend waiting for the application to respond when it is actively running and in use (part of the usage time). The total wait time is calculated as the time covered by the following components (which may overlap): the hang time when an application is not responding, or when the mouse pointer has a busy icon (Windows devices). For web applications, the wait time is the web page load time when both the browser window and its tab are in the foreground. For web applications, the wait time is the web page load time when both the browser window and its tab are in the foreground.

Enhanced Monitoring with Managed Applications

In addition to the above measurements, Aternity enhances monitoring of managed applications (even without any activities) by monitoring its PRC:

Field Description
Physical Memory of an application

Displays the average and maximum usage of a managed application's physical memory (known as the total working set) in megabytes over a one-hour period, which is part of the PRC.

High usage of an application's working set memory increases the chances of switching parts of the application into virtual memory, leading to an overall slowdown in performance.

Process CPU of an application

Displays the average and maximum CPU usage (in percent) of this managed application over a one-hour period, which is part of the application's process resource consumption (PRC).

Virtual Memory of an application

Displays the peak and average usage of a managed application's reserved memory (commit size) in gigabytes during a one-hour slot, which is part of the application's process resource consumption (PRC).

Health Events Reported on Apple Mac

Aternity monitors system health events and application health events to troubleshoot issues with one device or view common symptoms across multiple devices in your organization.

The reported application health events for Macs are:

Field Description Source
Crash

Aternity reports a native Mac app crashing only if it registers the crash in the MacOS system log.

The Aternity Agent for Mac queries the macOS system log.

Crash (After Hang)

Aternity uses the system log to determine when a user has manually forced an application's process to close after it stopped responding.

The Aternity Agent for Mac queries the macOS system log.

A system health event for a device is a significant problem at the level of the operating system which impacts on the device's overall health, like BSODs or other system crashes. The reported system health events for Macs are:

Field Description Source
System Crash

Aternity reports a system crash when it detected a kernel panic from the macOS system logs.

The Aternity Agent for Mac queries the macOS system log.

Unexpected Shutdown

Aternity reports an unexpected shutdown when reported in the macOS system logs.

This can be due to a hardware failure (like a power cut, or excessive heat) or a firmware or driver fault, or when a program forces the device to shut down while the computer is locked and password-protected.

The Aternity Agent for Mac queries the macOS system log.