View Skype for Business / Lync Call Data Collected by Aternity

Aternity collects a wide range of data for every audio and video call in Skype for Business or Lync on a monitored device, both for regular Office and O365.

You can view this information in most Aternity dashboards, including the Call Details dashboard, the Analyze Skype for Business Calls dashboard and the Calls Commonalities Analysis dashboard.

Call Details dashboard
Tip

Aternity currently focuses its collection of Skype calls on the level of audio quality, not video quality.

Field Description
Audio Forward Error Correction Used

Displays True if Skype dynamically switched on forward error correction (FEC) in a call, to combat packet loss. FEC sends extra packets containing redundant information, to help it complete the audio stream on the other end, hence it uses more bandwidth.

Audio Inbound Codec Name

Displays the name of the codec which Skype used to understand the incoming compressed sound.

Skype dynamically chooses the best codec to compress the audio signal, based on the bandwidth available and ensuring the recipient can unzip the audio on the other side.

Audio Inbound Jitter

Displays the differences (variance) in the delay of incoming audio packets from the other caller, or (in conference calls) from the Skype server to a caller, measured in milliseconds.

Wide differences in delay (above 30ms) means that some packets are much slower than others, so when they arrive at the other end, the order of the packets is jumbled, which creates a choppy or distorted sound. This is usually caused by network congestion, but you can counter it with a large enough buffer to re-order the jumbled packets.

Audio Inbound Packet Loss

Displays the percentage audio network packets in a Skype call which were lost in transit before reaching the participant. Any value above 5% affects audio quality significantly.

Audio Outbound Codec Name

Displays the name of the codec which Skype used to compress the outgoing sound.

Skype dynamically chooses the best codec to compress the audio signal, based on the bandwidth available and ensuring the recipient can unzip the audio on the other side.

Audio Outbound Jitter

Displays the differences (variance) in the delay of outgoing audio packets reaching the other caller, or (in conference calls) from a caller to the Skype server, measured in milliseconds.

Wide differences in delay (above 30ms) means that some packets are much slower than others, so when they arrive at the other end, the order of the packets is jumbled, which creates a choppy or distorted sound. This is usually caused by network congestion, but you can counter it with a large enough buffer to re-order the jumbled packets.

Audio Outbound Packet Loss

Displays the percentage of audio network packets in a Skype call which were lost in transit on its way to the other caller, or (in conference calls) from a participant to the Skype server. Any value above 5% affects audio quality significantly.

Audio Outbound Round Trip Time

Displays the time for an audio packet on a Skype call to reach the destination and come back again to the caller.

Call Directions

Displays the way a user created a Skype for Business or Lync call:

  • Incoming are the people who answered a Skype or Lync call.

  • Outgoing are the people who dialed a Skype or Lync call.

For example, if you have a call center and expect most calls to be incoming, you can confirm this expectation by monitoring the dominant call direction.

Call Duration

Displays the total length of calls actively connected during this time slot, in seconds.

Note

The call duration is NOT the usage time of Skype/Lync, since you can continue a call while the application runs in the background, or you can perform IM chats in the foreground without making a call.

Call Modes

There are two types of calls in Skype for Business or Lync: Direct between two devices, or Conference, where more than two devices connect to a bridge to participate in a call. Each connection to a call appears in the dashboards as a separate stream.

Call Types

There are two types of streams in Skype for Business or Lync: Audio only or Audio/Video.

Call Volumes

Displays the total number of calls during the dashboard timeframe.

Callee Device

The device of the callee (a Microsoft term) is the type of device used by the other participant in a Skype or Lync call:

  • PC indicates the other participant used Skype for Business or Lync running on a Windows desktop or laptop.

  • Conference Bridge indicates that this user was in a conference call, where every participant connects via the bridge. Hence the callee is the conference bridge.

  • iPhone indicates the other participant used the mobile iOS version of Skype for Business or Lync on an iPhone.

  • iPad indicates the other participant used the tablet iOS version of Skype for Business or Lync on an iPad.

  • Android indicates the other participant used the Android version of Skype for Business or Lync on an Android tablet or phone.

  • Mac indicates the other participant used the Mac version of Skype for Business or Lync on a Mac desktop or laptop.

  • Other can refer to a gateway or mediation server.

Capture Device Name

A capture device is a microphone, either built-in or standalone, used for collecting audio input to a Skype / Lync call.

Capture Device Driver Ver.

Displays the name and full version of the driver which supports the capture device in a Skype call. A capture device is a microphone, either built-in or standalone, used for collecting audio input to a Skype / Lync call.

Combined MOS

The combined MOS score (and status) for a device is the LOWER value of the inbound MOS and outbound MOS scores in a call.

Dropped Calls

A stream is dropped if Skype for Business or Lync ended the call unexpectedly, without the user manually ending the call. Aternity reports the failure and its reason.

End Call Reasons

Displays the quality and performance of calls which ended in different ways:

  • Ended Successfully are for calls which started and ended normally, with no unexpected disconnections.

  • Disconnected with Error: A stream is dropped if Skype for Business or Lync ended the call unexpectedly, without the user manually ending the call. Aternity reports the failure and its reason.

  • Failed Streams: A stream fails if Skype for Business or Lync could not successfully establish a connection and start. Aternity reports the failure and its reason as the SIP code and SIP string.

Error Code

Displays the Skype for Business error code for a failed call.

Failed Calls

A stream fails if Skype for Business or Lync could not successfully establish a connection and start. Aternity reports the failure and its reason as the SIP code and SIP string.

Inbound Degradation

Inbound degradation is the amount of reduction in the inbound MOS score which was due to a poor network connection. A high degradation indicates that the poor network MOS (packet loss, network jitter) played a significant role in lowering the audio experience.

Inbound MOS

The inbound MOS (or inbound listening MOS) for someone in a call is the MOS score of the incoming audio or video, showing if you clearly hear others in the call over background noise or a poor connection (inbound network MOS). The inbound MOS of a listener is the same as the outbound MOS of the speaker.

For example, if the other person spoke softly, or there was poor network speeds, or a dog was barking, it would lower the inbound MOS.

Inbound Network MOS

The inbound network MOS is part of the overall inbound listening MOS which focuses on the network connection quality like packet loss and network jitter.

Outbound MOS

The outbound MOS for someone in a call is the MOS score of your outgoing audio or video, showing if others clearly hear you in the call over background noise or a slow network (inbound network MOS).

For example, if you have a poor microphone or speak quietly far away from the mic, it would reduce your outbound MOS score for that call.

Render Device Names

Displays the the manufacturer and model name of a participant's audio output (render) device, and the type of device, like speakers or headphones.

Render Device Driver Ver.

Displays the full version and manufacturer of the driver which supports the audio output (render) device.

Score of MOS Values

Displays the activity score of all combined MOS scores during the timeframe.

Aternity creates baselines for MOS scores in exactly the same way that it baselines activity response times, combining them into an activity score and a status. A dropped stream lowers the score's status (like from Good to Fair). Failed stream always have a Critical status.

Use the score to measure short term (acute) recent or sudden changes from regular performance (baselined or manually predefined).

Therefore if the MOS status has been consistently poor for some time, Aternity may display a high activity score, because its baselines would have adjusted to this performance.

SIP Code

Displays the SIP error code on a failed Skype call. A stream fails if Skype for Business or Lync could not successfully establish a connection and start. Aternity reports the failure and its reason as the SIP code and SIP string.

SIP String

Displays the SIP error details on a failed Skype call. A stream fails if Skype for Business or Lync could not successfully establish a connection and start. Aternity reports the failure and its reason as the SIP code and SIP string.

Status

(SLA of combined MOS)

The status of a combined MOS score is its SLA status: above 3 is Satisfied (green ), between 2 and 3 is Dissatisfied (yellow ), and below 2 is Very dissatisfied (orange ). If the call failed, Aternity gives it a red status, but if it was less than a minute or without audio, it assigns None (colored gray ), because it was not possible to assign a score. If the call ends unexpectedly (dropped), Aternity lowers its status by one level, so that a dropped call with a Satisfied status becomes Dissatisfied.

Participants in a call have their own MOS scores and statuses

The status of the combined MOS is separate and distinct from the activity score, as it is more objective, because it is not derived from recent baselines. Use the combined MOS status for the status of long term (chronic) issues in call quality.